Types of Volunteer Roles

 

Corporate Volunteers

The RSL greatly appreciates the support of the volunteers from our corporate partners.  Our corporate volunteers assist with projects throughout the year such as preparations for the annual ANZAC and Poppy Appeals and helping us with the packing during our Christmas Parcels Project.  We are always keen to have new corporate volunteers joining us.

The preparations for the ANZAC and Poppy Appeals varies but it most often involves preparing trays and merchandise in readiness for dispatch to our army of volunteers and supporting organisations across the State.

Our Christmas Parcel Project provides a modest gift to many who would not otherwise receive a present.  It’s our way of letting people know we care.  These gifts are delivered through Home and Hospital Volunteer Visiting Program where volunteers visit veterans and widows living alone in their own homes, in residential aged care facilities or in hospital.  The corporate volunteers supporting this project help with preparing and packing gifts into boxes ready to be delivered to Sub Branches.

Appeals Collectors

Help raise the much needed funds for the Appeals by becoming an Appeals Collector in your local community. One of the greatest hurdles of fundraising is finding enough people to volunteer during the Appeals. Without volunteers from the community, the ANZAC Appeal and Poppy Appeal would not be able to provide much of the financial assistance and support to our current and former service personnel and their families. Becoming an Appeals Collector is a simple and very worthwhile way of providing assistance.

Welfare Officers

The role of a volunteer RSL Sub-Branch Welfare Officer is to provide welfare assistance to members of the ex-service community in accordance with the mission and associated policies and procedures of the RSL Victorian Branch and having regard for relevant regulatory requirements. The RSL has a proud history of undertaking this role through the voluntary contribution of many of its members. Over the course of our almost 97 year history, countless hours of voluntary assistance, and countless miles/kilometres of travel have been involved in this endeavour. The voluntary ethic has been nurtured, and it has been a privilege for those who volunteer to be of service to those who invariably value that support.

The present training regime for volunteer Welfare Officers who want to carry on the work of the RSL is well established and developed. It is ESO managed under the auspice of the Training Information Program (TIP), with funding and support in kind from the Commonwealth Government, administered through the Department of Veterans’ Affairs (DVA).

The training of a volunteer Welfare Officer consists of the following courses:

  • A Basic Welfare Officers Course of 2 or 3 days duration, again requiring subsequent on-the-job training under supervision of a mentor.
  • An Advanced Welfare Officers Course of 2 days duration.

Experience suggests that in all cases, some refresher training every three years would be highly beneficial.  This could hardly be considered onerous in view of the dependence veterans often place on the credibility of their supporting practitioner.

Veterans or people who are trained under the TIP program are not automatically covered for insurance through VITA. People trained through the TIP program need to be authorized and accredited by their RSL Sub-Branch to act for them in order to be covered by the Veterans’ Indemnity and Training Association (VITA) Insurance policy. The RSL Sub-Branch needs to ensure the following criteria for authorizing and accrediting Welfare Officer’s to act on their behalf are followed including:

  • They are in good standing of their parent organization and comply with the TIP Code of Ethics.
  • They have completed TIP training, including refresher training as needed.
  • Authorization in writing to act on their behalf to provide welfare services to the ex-service community at a level that matches their TIP levels of competency training and currency, and
  • Provide their service free of charge as per the requirements of the VITA indemnity insurance contract.

Welfare Officers are also required to undergo a National Police Check for Aged Care.

Home & Hospital Visiting

This is what the RSL is all about; mates helping mates. RSL volunteers spend time with ex-service men, women and war widows to ensure those living at home, in aged care facilities or in hospitals stay connected with their community. An hour of your time will make the world of difference to the person you visit and you will be surprised by how much you get from the experience as well.

The RSL’s Home and Hospital (H&H) Visiting Program has been active for many years. The program links volunteer visitors with members of the ex-service community who are frail and/or unwell in hospital, at home or in residential aged care facilities. Recipients of visits are usually older, frailer members who value the support and continuing contact of an ex-service organisation.

H&H visitors are volunteers who have shown care and compassion toward older, isolated veterans and others, by generously offering to spend time with them. H&H are required to undergo a National Police Check for Aged Care.

Pensions Officers

The League has a proud history of undertaking that role through the voluntary contribution of many of its members.  Over the course of our almost 97 year history, countless hours of voluntary assistance, and countless miles/kilometres of travel have been involved in this endeavour.  The voluntary ethic has been nurtured, and it has been a privilege for those who volunteer to be of service to those who invariably value that help and support.

The present training regime for those volunteers who want to carry on the work of the League as a Pension’s Officer is well established and developed.   It is ESO managed under the auspice of the Training Information Program (TIP), with funding and support in kind from the Commonwealth Government, administered through the Department of Veterans’ Affairs (DVA). www.dva.gov.au

The training of a volunteer Pension’s Officer consists of the following courses:
  • A Basic Pension’s Officer Course of 2 or 3 days duration, following which, on-the-job training under the supervision of a mentor is required.
  • Specialist 1-3 day courses on particular aspects of pension work.
  • The SRCA Basic Claims Officer, and a MRCA Basic Claims Officer Course, both of which are of 2 or 3 days with the prerequisite of having done the Basic Pension Officer Course.
  • A Case Officer Course of 3 days for more experienced pension officers to prepare them to assist advocates to the VRB.
  • A Basic Advocates Course of 3 days duration to prepare individuals to be advocates to the VRB.
  • A Tribunal Advocates Course, designed to prepare experienced advocates to appear before the AAT.  This is a 5 day live-in course by selection only.
  • A range of other specialist and update courses of 1-3 days duration to complement the above training options.
Experience suggests that in all cases, some refresher training every three years would be highly beneficial. This could hardly be considered onerous in view of the dependence veterans often place on the credibility of their supporting practitioner.
 
Community Fundraising

If you are interested in involving your local community group, sporting club or school in fundraising activities for the ANZAC Appeal or Poppy Appeal, or you are wanting updates on RSL events which are taking place in your local community, please contact your local RSL Sub Branch.